Neighborhood Power Surges

Neighborhood Power Surges

On Friday, August 16th, many neighbors in Lindley Park experienced an extreme power surge resulting from a tree on Masonic Drive falling on a circuit and severely damaging a line. As a result, many homes incurred damages including fried breaker boxes, AC units, major appliances, computers, and other household electronics. An unofficial count suggests that some 365 homes were affected. Additionally, during summer storms some neighbors have reported power outages and minor surges during the storms, and again when power was restored.

On August 27th, the LPNA held a general meeting to discuss this issue and devise a plan of action for affected neighbors. Neighbors have been receiving mixed messages from Duke Energy: Of those who have filed claims, some have been denied outright, while others have received claim numbers.  Duke Energy thus far has stated that they are not responsible for the damages because the fallen tree was not in their right-of-way.  The City of Greensboro has since inspected the tree (which was on City property behind the Rec Center) and determined that it was healthy. They also did not have any complaints or work orders on file regarding that specific tree.

In general, Lindley Park neighbors simply want to feel as if Duke Energy cares about them and the damages to their homes. Neighbors also want to know if the City is or can be held responsible when a tree on City property causes damages such as these.

The  following plan of action and recommendations was established: 

1. The LPNA recommends that anyone impacted, whether big or small, file a claim with Duke Energy. This way Duke Energy (and neighbors) will have a record of the damage, as well as how many homes were impacted. www.duke-energy.com/customer-service/report-claim

2. Neighbors should consider installing a whole-house surge protector. Duke offers home surge protection plans, or you can contact a local licensed electrician. www.duke-energy.com/home-services/surge) Research: ipropertymanagement.com/reviews/best-whole-home-surge-protector

3. Replace smaller (strip) surge protectors every 3-4 years, as they burn out over time due to micro surges.

4. The LPNA is working to have a Duke Energy representative, a Greensboro district representative, and/or the mayor attend the next business meeting on September 24th to discuss the issue.

5. The LPNA will be using the COLUMNS newsletter,  social media, email, and other channels, such as an info booth at the Corner Market to share and gather information. We would like to know:

a. how many neighbors were impacted
b. an accurate calculation of the total damages
c. research the effectiveness/impact of whole-house surge protectors or other protection systems

The LPNA will hold a special meeting Tuesday, October 15 at 7:00PM at the Lindley Recreation Center to discuss this issue.

Please use the form below to let the LPNA know how you were affected.

(Items with * are required)


*Your Name

* Your Email

* Phone Number

* Address (Street Name and House Number)

Homes reported so far:

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